The rise in Hybrid and Virtual Events

Face-to-face interaction will never go away, but there are times when virtual elements will be a necessary part of your event programme and over the past few months, we’ve seen a rise in the number of enquiries for hybrid events.

IET Birmingham: Austin Court can offer the perfect blend of a stunning venue, which is easily accessible for speakers, with high-quality professional event technology and AV.

Hosting a virtual event requires the same care and attention as a conventional in-person event.

With both events, you need to effectively plan and promote the event, whilst engaging with your attendees. This will prove essential to ensure your event success.

IET Birmingham: Austin Court has been providing events based on high-quality AV and technology for more than 10 years and as such, has experienced staff able to offer a wide range of solutions to ensure your event runs smoothly and reaches your target audience.

What are Virtual Events?

Virtual events are not just small one-off presentations. Chances are you have already attended one, be it a webinar, an on-demand tutorial, or even a conference. All of which from the comfort of your desk or home.

A virtual event is simply one where individuals experience the event and its content online rather than in person.

What are Hybrid Events?

A hybrid event is one in which a technology solution is used to permit both a live and an online audience to view the same content at the same time.

It’s an event where the online and live audiences can interact simultaneously with speakers and other commentators, and where they can interact with each other within the timeframe of the event.

In other words, a hybrid event blurs the line between physical and virtual. It creates an environment where internet attendees can interact with speakers and other guests as if they were actually there. It allows them to participate in Q&A sessions, chat about what they’re seeing on-screen.

Event technology and platforms to host are essential

Hybrid events rely on technology. Attendance would be impossible without the use of computers, mobile devices, fast wi-fi and streaming/broadcasting capabilities.

IET Birmingham: Austin Court can provide a specialist team to enable live streaming and broadcasting. We can confidently promise first-class video content for your organisation. Whatever your hybrid or virtual event need, get in touch with our dedicated Event Co-ordinators who are happy to find the right package for you and your event.

Three benefits to hybrid events

  1. Delegate engagement
    Hybrid events integrate physical events with an online audience and allow for delegate interaction. Hybrid events aren’t just live-streaming, they allow so many ways for delegates to get involved and be a part of the event, rather than just watching it. It also allows delegates who may not have been able to travel to a venue, perhaps because of cost or time, to virtually attend and get involved.
  2. Professionalism
    Live streaming from an event venue to an online audience gives the event a sense of credibility and professionalism compared to a speaker presenting from their living room. Being on stage in a lecture theatre for example, will command attention, whether in person or virtually, and your event can benefit from added branding behind/around the speaker who is presenting.  
  3. Leave the tech to the experts
    Like when booking a face-to-face event at a venue, choosing a hybrid event means you can leave the tech side of the event to the professionals, especially if you find a venue with innovative technology an experienced in-house AV team. It means you won’t have to worry about technology when planning or hosting your event (as you may have to with a fully virtual event).

 

For more information on available packages

Find out more about hybrid event packages at Austin Court or alternatively please contact our sales team for more information on the various packages IET Birmingham: Austin Court can offer.

Email us at austincourt@ietvenues.co.uk

 

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